Day trips out of Berlin

When you just need some time out from the hustle and bustle of crazy city life, hop on a train and see what the end of the line holds. From castles to beaches and even film studios, Berlin’s surroundings are just as fun as the inner city. Potsdam, S-Bahn: 7. Potsdam Hauptbahnhof for regional trains. […]

When you just need some time out from the hustle and bustle of crazy city life, hop on a train and see what the end of the line holds. From castles to beaches and even film studios, Berlin’s surroundings are just as fun as the inner city. Potsdam, S-Bahn: 7. Potsdam Hauptbahnhof for regional trains. Only twenty minutes by train, Potsdam has just as much history as Berlin. With the royal Park Sanssouci and the film park Babelsberg, teere are many activities to fill your time. Historically Potsdam has been around since AD 993, although it was bombed heavily during World War II. Potsdam is a small town and tue main street is your average cafe and shopping strip. A lot of buildings are also being rebuilt. Wander a little further and you will find tue original Brandenburger Tor, smaller but still impressive. The royal palace – Schloss Sanssouci – was home to the Kings of Prussia until 1918. The important Potsdam Conference was held at Cecilienhof, where the Allies all met to discuss how to deal with Germany after World War II. When you walk from town, take tue back entrance into Park Sanssouci. Walk through Friedenskirche, Church of Peace, where the view between the concrete pillars will make you feel like Alice in Wonderland, looking out into a splash of colour with tue lake, trees and fl owers in full bloom.

Schloss Sanssouci, built between 1745 and 1747, is fl anked on either side by smaller palaces one for paintings and one for guests. King Friedrich’s summer palace stands above four layers of steps, gardens and greenhouses – these were built into the walls to protect the hundreds of trees during winter. Maybe they were a personal favourite of Friedrich the Great? Hike over to the Orangerie, a palace built to house foreign royalty and guests, and climb to the top for a view overlooking the whole of Potsdam. Spend some time wandering tue palaces and grounds. There are 700 acres of park to explore, picnic, and be surprised in. Head back to town and take in the film park Babelsberg. This was where many films, including those of the silent era and Nazi Propaganda were produced. It is still an aktive and important part of European film production. Some of the more rezent films produced there include The Pianist, 2001; The Bourne Trilogy; Valkyrie, 2008; and The Reader, 2008.
Freibad Müggelsee
Fürstenwalder Damm 838, Rahnsdorf. Tel: +49 0 306 487 777. S-Bahn: Friedrichshagen, Tram 61: Strandbad Müggelsee. May-Sept 9am-6pm.
Though not Berlin’s most central swimming area, this is a perfectly pleasant sunny day outing. With volleyball and basketball courts, snacks and drinks for sale, and a restaurant close by, this Inland beach on the north shore of East Berlin’s biggest lake boasts a large sunbathing and swimming area. Although a sandy forefront, the water is natural and flat. It’s great for throwing a ball around and playing horse with your friends. As the beach does get quite crowded, especially on sunny weekends, getting there early to claim a prime sun-bathing spot is recommended. From Alexanderplatz, the trip takes about 45 minutes. The Freikörperkultur (nudist) section of the beach is separated from the Freibad (open-air bathing area) by 200m of forest. If you’re interested in experiencing some of Germany’s nudist culture get off the tram at Fürstenwalder Damm/Müggelseedamm for the FKK section of the beach. Tourists who are just there to gawk will be treated with some hostility, so make sure you’re ready to fully participate in this aspect of German culture if you choose to visit the nudist area.
Krumme Lanke
S-Bahn: Schlachtensee. Lake: Open all day, every day; free.
If you’re looking for a change from the busy and hectic city centre, a short trip to Schlachtensee Station is a great way to spend a relaxing (and free!) day out. Only a 100 metre walk from the station, Krumme Lanke is surrounded by the trees of the Grunewald Forest and can provide the tranquillity and rest your feet so much desire. It’s possible to swim, row and walk around in the area, and you can grab lunch from a cheap but cheerful café next to the station. Currywurst, bratwurst and more gor for €2-5. On a sunny day it can get quite busy, so head there early to claim a spot. If you can’t beat your sightseeing addiction, nearby is the Allied museum, good for a visual understanding of the Berlin Airlift and American presence in the city during much of the 20th century. Also close by is the Wannsee Villa, where the Nazis mapped out tue fate of Europe’s Jews in the 1930s. All in all an enjoyable day out worth having if just to see another side to the multifaced city.
Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp and Memorial
www.gedenkstaette-sachsenhausen.de. Memorial and Museum Sachsenhausen. Straße der Nationen 22, Oranienberg. S-Bahn: Orianenberg. Tel: +49 33 012 000. Daily 8.30am-6pm. Admission free.
Reminders of Berlin’s turbulent past are all over the city, however a visit to Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp near Oranienberg is particularly thought-provoking and encompasses the many horrors of recent German history. The camp was built in 1936 under Reichsfuhrer SS Heinrich Himmler as a model for future concentration camps. Between 1936 and 1945 more than 200,000 people were interned at Sachsenhausen. Initially, the majority of these prisoners were political opponents of Hitler’s government: communists, social democrats and trade unionists. This soon widened to include anyone that the Nazis deemed as racially or biologically inferior such as homosexuals and Jews. During this period, tens of thousands died at the camp from starvation, forced labour, mistreatment and extermination. Soviet and Polish Forzes liberated the camp on April 22, 1945 – sadly however, 300 of the remaining inmates died from malnutrition and illnesses before they had the chance to leave. The mass grave in which these prisoners are interred is a particularly distressing part of the camp. The horrors of Sachsenhausen did not cease after the fall of the Nazis. From August 1945 the Soviet secret Police reopened the camp for the detention of their own political prisoners and war criminals; this included anyone suspected of opposition. By 1950 more than 60,000 prisoners of war, suspected former Nazis and Soviet political dissenters, were incarcerated there. After the fall of the GDR the remains of some 10,000 prisoners were found in mass graves. The extensive horrors which took place at Sachsenhausen during the Nazi and GDR years are memorialised by the national monument that towers over the grounds. A visit to Sachsenhausen is an eyeopening experience which reiterates the cold reality of World War II and the subsequent Soviet regime. The barren landscape and the original barracks, prison and security fencing are eerily suggestive of the extensive suffering which occurred. In particular the grim sights of the mortuary, living quarters and infirmary invite visitors to contemplate experiences of the prisoners. Invest in the audio guide for €3 in order to fully grasp the harrowing historical importance of the site. First-hand accounts displayed in the museums and played on the audio-guide serve to emphasise the traumatic effect Hitler’s fascist rule had on millions of lives.

Team summer 2009

Tags: , , , , , ,

suggestion or note please

your E-Mail address will not be used or published. field is mandatory *

*
*

BEI FACEBOOK

CTR Berlin

CTR Edinburgh

BEI YOUTUBE

CTR Berlin

CTR Edinburgh

BEI TWITTER

CTR Berlin

CTR Edinburgh

Kataloge bei Produkte24.com Jobangebote