Visit Scotland, Savour Scotland

When travelling to a new place, where and what to eat is an important part of the adventure. Most travelers dine out while on vacations and many look forward to trying new and culturally unique foods—on trips to new places, you’re not just eating simply to satisfy hunger, you’re eating for the experience of it—the […]

When travelling to a new place, where and what to eat is an important part of the adventure. Most travelers dine out while on vacations and many look forward to trying new and culturally unique foods—on trips to new places, you’re not just eating simply to satisfy hunger, you’re eating for the experience of it—the experience of new foods, food preparations, dining styles, and restaurants.

In this quest for new and unique cuisine, Edinburgh and its multitude of restaurants do not fail. From the outside looking in, Scotland’s food might seem to fall in that broad category of “bland and heavy” to which most of the food in the United Kingdom has been unfortunately assigned. This country is seen as a land where potatoes, meats, and gravies reign supreme and where every meal is just average; a far cry from the haute cuisine of France and Italy. However, to dismiss this food is to deny your taste buds and rumbling stomach a savoury adventure.

The food here is not heavy and bland, but hearty and unassuming. Traditional Scottish dishes utilize simple, fresh fare and uncomplicated seasonings to create comforting, flavourful food that’s hard not to like. Edinburgh boasts a multitude of restaurants offering traditional Scottish fare, and a trip to the farmers’ market will offer a glimpse at what Scotland’s capital city has to offer on a small-town, local scale. Haggis is perhaps the best known food of the Scots; it’s a mixture made of minced sheep’s pluck (heart, lungs, and liver), onion, oatmeal, and spices that’s encased in a sheep’s stomach, then removed and served. It’s a salty, meaty concoction that you’ll be able to find stuffed into pies, served alongside neeps and tatties, or piled onto sandwiches, and it’s a must-try when you’re in this city. Another quintessentially Scottish food is the savoury meat pie, like the Scotch pie, a flaky pastry filled with minced mutton and Christmassy spices that’s absolutely smashing with some mash and gravy or a cold cider. Markets and speciality shops offer up traditional cheeses, including Caboc, a Scottish cream cheese rolled in oatmeal, and Dunlop, a soft and mild cheddar cheese. Venison, salmon, and smoked haddock can be found on the menus at many restaurants, and if you pop in for a visit to one of the local cafés, you’re likely to find black pudding, cock-a-leekie soup, or perhaps even Cullen Skink, a thick and creamy soup made with haddock, potatoes and cream.

There’s a wealth of culinary delights in this city of cobblestones and grey skies, so while you’re here, you’re better off ignoring the glowing signs of sandwich shops and chain restaurants in favour of the markets, little cafés, and traditional Scottish restaurants along every street.

Team Curso/CTR Edinburgh, Sarah Schiavoni, Photo: Miriam Steimer

Aktuelles zu den Praktikumsprogrammen Reisejournalismus/Culture in Grossbritannien

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  1. Luca has added a suggestion, note on 27. January 2014 | Permalink

    hey, sieht für mich auch bestens aus. Edinburgh scheint auch recht vielversprechend zu sein. Wir waren in Lyon. Unseren Guide mag ich natürlich noch ein bisschen lieber. Aber wahrscheinlich auch einfach weil ich Frankreich fan bin und nicht so sehr GB bevorzuge. Lyon kann ich empfehlen. Alles Beste von Luca

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